Predictors and outcomes of sports coaches’ athlete-invested contingent self-worth

This study delves into the intricate relationship between coaches' self-worth and their coaching styles, particularly concerning how some coaches attach their sense of worth to the successes or failures of their athletes. It explores the impact of this Athlete-Invested Contingent Self-Worth (AICS) on coaching approaches and athlete performance. Additionally, it sheds light on various predictors and outcomes of AICS, offering insights into how these factors influence coaches' behaviors and the implications for interventions at both the coach and club levels.

This study delves into the intricate relationship between coaches’ self-worth and their coaching styles, particularly concerning how some coaches attach their sense of worth to the successes or failures of their athletes. It explores the impact of this Athlete-Invested Contingent Self-Worth (AICS) on coaching approaches and athlete performance. Additionally, it sheds light on various predictors and outcomes of AICS, offering insights into how these factors influence coaches’ behaviors and the implications for interventions at both the coach and club levels.

Athlete-Invested Contingent Self-Worth (AICS): Coaches who tie their self-worth to their athletes’ success or failure exhibit a controlling coaching style and lack a constructive structuring approach.

Predictors and Coaching Styles: AICS in coaches relates to adopting harsh coaching methods and neglecting appropriate guidance, feedback, and trust in athletes.

Coaches’ perception of an evaluative climate by the club board affects AICS more than parental evaluation.

Impact on Athlete Performance: Coaches high in AICS invest less in athletes after poor performance, indicating a detachment of self-worth from their athletes during failures.

Intervention Implications: Intervention programs should not only focus on teaching motivating coaching behaviors but also address coaches’ underlying self-worth fragility. Educating coaches to manage pressure, raise awareness about AICS, and enhance coping skills can prevent resorting to controlling practices.Organization-Level Interventions: Sports organizations should foster a supportive rather than an evaluative climate to prevent coaches’ need frustration and, consequently, a controlling coaching approach.